Category: Cemeteries

  • Concord Presbyterian Church and Cemetery, Carrick

    Concord Presbyterian Church

    This building was dedicated in 1915, but its congregation was organized in 1831—and really dates from before that, since local members had been meeting before the Presbytery recognized them as a church. This was a country church that was engulfed by city in the early 1900s; in its old country churchyard are the graves of a number of early settlers and the third mayor of Pittsburgh.

    In black and white
    From the churchyard
  • Ancient Graveyard, Mighty Oak

    A tree seldom gets a good chance to spread out and be itself this way, but this splendid oak has been allowed to dominate the old St. Clair Cemetery, a burying-ground in Mount Lebanon where many of the early settlers of the South Hills are buried.

    You can find more of the St. Clair Cemetery in Father Pitt’s Pittsburgh Cemeteries.

  • Angels for Halloween

    Recording angel on the Vallowe monument, South Side Cemetery.

    Since most of the world is going for silly deviltry, old Pa Pitt decided to be a bit contrarian and put together a collection of angels. All these and many more angels can be found at Father Pitt’s Pittsburgh Cemeteries site.

    Hax–McCullough monument, Allegheny Cemetery.
    Haudenshield-Robinson Monument, Chartiers Cemetery.
    Nilles angel, South Side Cemetery.
  • Penn Avenue Gatehouse, Allegheny Cemetery

    Father Pitt has always had mixed feelings about HDR (“high-dynamic-range”) images. They are made from multiple exposures—this one, for example, is put together from three photographs—in an attempt to capture the detail in both the highlights and the shadows. On the one hand, they always strike him as artificial-looking; on the other, HDR imaging was the only effective way to capture both the stonework and the lowering clouds in this picture. If you look closely, you will notice an artifact of the process: it was a windy day, so the stones are sharp but the trees are blurred.

    This is the Penn Avenue gatehouse of Allegheny Cemetery, seen from inside the cemetery. Old Pa Pitt returned two days later to try another HDR image, and this time—with some tweaking of software settings—he managed a more natural-looking result:

    If he were at all concerned with his reputation as an artist, he would have led with this picture. But he thought you might enjoy seeing a first attempt and the refinement that followed, in that order.

    If you are looking for some atmospheric fun for Halloween, Father Pitt’s Pittsburgh Cemeteries is full of interesting pictures and information.

  • Old Tree, South Side Cemetery

  • Fall in the Cemetery

    An experiment in HDR photography: this photo of the Robert Pitcairn mausoleum in the Homewood Cemetery is made from three separate exposures. It’s okay. It’s probably not much better than the result that could be got by manipulating one of the three pictures in the series.

    Fall is old Pa Pitt’s favorite time to take pictures in cemeteries, and right now his Pittsburgh Cemeteries site is full of fall color.

  • Christ Blessing Arlington

    A life-size statue of Christ in St. Paul’s Lutheran Cemetery, Mount Oliver, looks out over the back streets of Arlington.

  • Mount Lebanon Cemetery Office

    This fine vernacular-Gothic house serves as the gatehouse and office for the Mount Lebanon Cemetery, which was founded in 1901. It’s charmingly out of place in its neighborhood, which is a later development where most of the houses date from after the First World War.

  • Kerr Monument, Trinity Churchyard

    Hidden on the left side of the cathedral is a narrow arm of the churchyard with a few old monuments, with the massive bulk of the Oliver Building towering over them. Most people who visit Trinity Churchyard never find their way to this side of it, but it’s worth a few moments of contemplation.

  • Spooky Old Tree in Lebanon Church Cemetery

    Every graveyard needs a tree like this.

    Camera: Olympus E-20n.