Colonel Alexander Leroy Hawkins Memorial

Colonel Alexander Leroy Hawkins memorial

Col. Hawkins was a state senator as well as a much-respected officer in the Spanish-American War, which America fought to free the Spanish colonies, and the ensuing Philippine insurrection, which America fought to keep her newly acquired colony. He died in 1899; this memorial was put up in 1904. Originally the base extended in an embracing curve, as we see in this old photograph from Historic Pittsburgh; the extensions were probably cut off when the approaches were built for the Panther Hollow Bridge.

Memorial as built
Statue of Col. Hawkins
Inscription

In an earlier version of this article, Father Pitt had negligently typed “1894” instead of “1904” as the date of this memorial. It is harder than one thinks to cross the gap between centuries.

St. Peter

Statue of St. Peter

St. Peter, with his key, stands in his niche on St. Paul’s Cathedral in Oakland.

Reliefs by John Massey Rhind on the People’s Savings Bank Building

Relief by John Massey Rhind

John Massey Rhind was Andrew Carnegie’s favorite sculptor; he gave us the Noble Quartet in front of the Carnegie Institute and the statue of Robert Burns outside Phipps Conservatory. Here he gives us some allegorical figures to adorn the entrances to the People’s Savings Bank’s splendid tower at Fourth Avenue and Wood Street. Not altogether coincidentally, the building itself was designed by Alden & Harlow, Carnegie’s favorite architects, whose firm (with their earlier partner Longfellow) was also responsible for the Carnegie Institute. Above, the Wood Street side; below, the Fourth Avenue side.

Fourth Avenue side

St. Simon the Zealot

St. Simon the Zealot

A statue of St. Simon the Zealot on the east transept façade of St. Paul’s Cathedral. He is identified by the instrument of his martyrdom, the saw, which (according to one common tradition) was also how the prophet Isaiah was killed.

Lion on the Keystone Bank Building

Lion on the Keystone Bank

Fourth Avenue has a denser population of lions than anywhere else in Pittsburgh, and possibly anywhere else in North America.