Tag: Allegheny River

  • Smallman Street

    Smallman Street

    Smallman Street in the Strip changes over time, but it keeps its traditional link with the food business. The Strip became the wholesale-food district because the Pennsylvania Railroad unloaded the culinary treasures of the earth here. Today those treasures arrive mostly by truck.

    The glory of Smallman Street is the broad plaza from 16th to 21st Streets, leading to St. Stanislaus Kostka, the mother church of Polish Catholicism in Pittsburgh, and one of Frederick Sauer’s most distinguished works.

    Smallman Street
  • Sixteenth Street Bridge

    Sixteenth Street Bridge

    The architectural aspects of the Sixteenth Street Bridge, now named for David McCullough, were designed by Warren and Wetmore, the architects of Grand Central Station in New York.

  • 31st Street Bridge

    31st Street Bridge

    In order to line up with the street grid of the Strip, the 31st Street Bridge has an odd kink at the south end. Here we see it from Wiggins Street, Polish Hill.

  • What’s Left of the Manchester Bridge

    The Manchester Bridge connected the Point with the North Side until 1969. When it was taken down, it left one looming black stone pier on the North Shore. After it had loomed for decades, architect Lou Astorino came up with the idea of transforming it into a memorial for Fred Rogers, with a colossal statue by Robert Berks framed by an oval cutout. Here we see the pier from across the river in Point Park.

  • Heinz Field

  • Fort Duquesne Bridge

  • A Lot of Bridges

    West End Bridge

    Above: the West End Bridge over the Ohio, with the Ohio Connecting Railroad Bridge behind it, and the McKees Rocks Bridge behind that. Below, the Allegheny, with the Fort Duquesne Bridge, the Three Sisters, the Fort Wayne railroad bridge, the Veterans Bridge, and the Sixteenth Street Bridge. For extra credit, see if you can point out the Twenty-Eighth Street Bridge. (Click on the picture to make it very big.)

    Allegheny River
  • Roberto Clemente Bridge

    The Sixth Street or Roberto Clemente Bridge, looking toward the North Side, in glorious black and white.

  • Washington Crossing the Allegheny, 1753

    From American Scenery, 1854 (almost exactly a century after the event depicted here). —Young Washington’s raft capsized on the way over, and he nearly drowned. He could have just used the Fortieth Street Bridge, but George had to do everything the hard way.